startwithaseed:

dewdropzgarden:

Echinacea is well known for its anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory properties.  It is commonly recommended by herbalists as an agent to lessen the symptoms and duration at the onset of a cold or the flu.  Liquid form seems to be the most effective way, taken in a Tea to be used up to 6 times per day, or as an Oil at one drop every 2-3 hours or so (mix it in warm water because it tastes bad).  Alternatively, the leaves can be dried, pulverized into a powder, and made into Capsules for when it is inconvenient to utilize its beneficial properties otherwise. This method also solves the problem of the bad taste. As a cold and flu preventative, Echinacea has not been conclusively proven scientifically, but as with most herbs, it hasn’t been tested extensively either.  There are plenty of people who swear by it, and it is safe to take intermittently for a couple of weeks a month if you want to experiment with its possible preventative properties.  
Echinacea also appears to be useful for a plethora of other common ailments, and a tea can be made to reduce symptoms of scratchy or sore throat, lymph node inflammation, stomach cramps, and urinary tract infections.  There is some indication that it is beneficial in cancer patients, helping to rejuvenate the system after chemotherapy, and it is widely used as a general blood purifier.  Externally, it can be made into an Ointment for treatment of insect bites, burns, measles, skin ulcers, herpes sores, cold sores, and yeast infections in women.  The Indians swore by it as being an effective anti-venom agent for snakebites, but this hasn’t been conclusively proven.  It would sure be worth a try in a situation with no doctors close by, however.
Echinacea is safe to use other than for people with allergies to members of the daisy family.  A doctor should be consulted first for people with AIDS, HIV, or other immune system problems. (source)

Grew these in my last house and boy did I use them for everything except cut flowers. I love these little guys. Hmmmm…I should grow more.

startwithaseed:

dewdropzgarden:

Echinacea is well known for its anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory properties.  It is commonly recommended by herbalists as an agent to lessen the symptoms and duration at the onset of a cold or the flu.  Liquid form seems to be the most effective way, taken in a Tea to be used up to 6 times per day, or as an Oil at one drop every 2-3 hours or so (mix it in warm water because it tastes bad).  Alternatively, the leaves can be dried, pulverized into a powder, and made into Capsules for when it is inconvenient to utilize its beneficial properties otherwise. This method also solves the problem of the bad taste. As a cold and flu preventative, Echinacea has not been conclusively proven scientifically, but as with most herbs, it hasn’t been tested extensively either.  There are plenty of people who swear by it, and it is safe to take intermittently for a couple of weeks a month if you want to experiment with its possible preventative properties.  

Echinacea also appears to be useful for a plethora of other common ailments, and a tea can be made to reduce symptoms of scratchy or sore throat, lymph node inflammation, stomach cramps, and urinary tract infections.  There is some indication that it is beneficial in cancer patients, helping to rejuvenate the system after chemotherapy, and it is widely used as a general blood purifier.  Externally, it can be made into an Ointment for treatment of insect bites, burns, measles, skin ulcers, herpes sores, cold sores, and yeast infections in women.  The Indians swore by it as being an effective anti-venom agent for snakebites, but this hasn’t been conclusively proven.  It would sure be worth a try in a situation with no doctors close by, however.

Echinacea is safe to use other than for people with allergies to members of the daisy family.  A doctor should be consulted first for people with AIDS, HIV, or other immune system problems. (source)

Grew these in my last house and boy did I use them for everything except cut flowers. I love these little guys. Hmmmm…I should grow more.

foxykurt:

what really matters

foxykurt:

what really matters

dacheese-queen:

5582db:

Motoi Yamamoto - Labyrinth (salt)

fucking patience man

I can’t fricking believe myself the first thought I had was its like those awful salt mazes to torture slugs x10000 and just eeeeeew noooooooo I did not want that thought in my brain

constant-instigator:

I get why a lot of people hate the whole princess culture aimed at little girls. There’s a hell of a lot of toxic bullshit in there.

But when I was a tiny princess, my dad used to be my royal advisor. He would come to me, and over tea we would discuss the problems of…

heartsea:

 

Rainbow Fragments on Spider Webs

The entangled pearl necklaces pictured above are actually droplets of dew on a spider web.
The subtle colors displayed here resulted when sunlight illuminated the web, creating a multitude of rainbow fragments. Note that, in general, the smaller dew drops, residing on the thinnest silk strands, are nearly colorless.
With these smaller drop sizes, wave interference acts to diminish coloration because colors tend to overlap one another.

heartsea:

 

Rainbow Fragments on Spider Webs

The entangled pearl necklaces pictured above are actually droplets of dew on a spider web.

The subtle colors displayed here resulted when sunlight illuminated the web, creating a multitude of rainbow fragments. Note that, in general, the smaller dew drops, residing on the thinnest silk strands, are nearly colorless.

With these smaller drop sizes, wave interference acts to diminish coloration because colors tend to overlap one another.

archiemcphee:

With the weather getting colder (that is, for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere) it’s high time we shared more images from the Department of Awesome Snowflake Photography. These amazing photos were taken by Russian photographer Alexey Kljatov, who adapted his camera in order to achieve remarkably close-up focus on individual snowflakes after they’ve fall on the ground. He illuminates his shots with a flashlight and the background texture is dark wool fabric.

Alexy’s images reveal the unique geometric shapes of each snowflake with such astonishing clarity that it’s easy to forget just how tiny they really are. Visit Alexey Kljatov’s Flickr stream to view many more of his remarkable snowflake photos.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

ironinomicon:

mineralists:

RhodochrositeHuachocolpa Mine, Peru

wow it’s a rock made out of roses this is soft grunge as fuck

ironinomicon:

mineralists:

Rhodochrosite
Huachocolpa Mine, Peru

wow it’s a rock made out of roses this is soft grunge as fuck

yeardleysmith:

Circumhorizontal arc over Ohio, May 2009.
For a circumhorizontal arc to be visible, the Sun must be at least 58 degrees high in a sky where cirrus clouds are present. Furthermore, the numerous, flat, hexagonal ice-crystals that compose the cirrus cloud must be aligned horizontally to properly refract sunlight in a collectively similar manner.
Credit & Copyright: Todd Sladoje

yeardleysmith:

Circumhorizontal arc over Ohio, May 2009.

For a circumhorizontal arc to be visible, the Sun must be at least 58 degrees high in a sky where cirrus clouds are present. Furthermore, the numerous, flat, hexagonal ice-crystals that compose the cirrus cloud must be aligned horizontally to properly refract sunlight in a collectively similar manner.

Credit & Copyright: Todd Sladoje

(Source: justinbiebergoth)

sweetcicadaboy:

supernovagirl95:

*hums*

somewhere this is the building material for a palace on a moon

sweetcicadaboy:

supernovagirl95:

*hums*

somewhere this is the building material for a palace on a moon